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: in the 2008 campaign, she ridiculed hillary clinton's foreign policy experience and called john mccain "reckless and confused." if the president does nominate her, those who know her say she is more than up for the fight. although this would be a bruising battle, diane, i can tell you she would almost certainly have the votes to be confirmed. >> all right. jon karl reporting tonight. thank you, jon. >>> now we turn to the other battle brewing tonight, the clock is still ticking on the fiscal cliff. 35 days, taxes including on the middle class, will rise in america unless congress reaches a deal. abc senior white house correspondent jake tapper tells us the latest on this duel that would affect every single american family. >> reporter: the manufacturers of these angry birds building sets in pennsylvania will later this week be visited by president obama as he makes his case for raising tax rates on wealthier americans as part of a larger deal with congress. and while the president is not trying to provoke anger necessarily, he is trying to drum up passions for his proposal. meeting
ridiculed hillary clinton's foreign policy experience and called john mccain reckless and confused. if the president does nominate her, those who know susan rice well say she's more than up for the fight, and although it would be a bruising confirmation battle, she almost certainly would have the votes to be confirmed. jonathan karl, abc news, washington. >>> interesting parallel that story points out between condoleezza, confirmation process, and this one. "the washington post," interesting profile, i like the human nuggets they find. as u.n. ambassador she gained a reputation for sharp intellect. and sharp elbows. she is not known for diplomatic finesse, known for being aggressive sometimes too aggressive and using salty language on occasion. in private she has a good sense of humor. trying to dig up some humanity on her as well, but clearly she's a bulldog behind closed doors. >> they wouldn't indicate whether or not they would block the nomination if it gets to the point. the president has not nominated her to this point, we just want to make that clear. but some of the beef th
, the administration chose that particular foreign policy leader to go on sunday shows as opposed to other folks in the administration. my hunch is -- this is really just my guess. it isn't something i've coordinated. >> no talking points with the intelligence? >> no talking points. my view of it is that this was obviously a terrible incident where americans were killed. and there was clear sort of lack of full coordination and communication between elements of the executive branch. and they made a choice to have her be the sort of face forward for the administration on responding to questions about what had happened and why and when and where. i would be joining calls for an investigation and a joint committee and so forth if the administration were stonewalling and saying we won't be accountable for this. we won't tell you what happened. we won't get into the background. that's not been my experience. the senate foreign relations committee on which i serve unanimously sent a letter to the administration asking that we be briefe
for international peace. we believe that our global economic interests and our foreign policy values are closely tied together. they should be closely tied together. and that's why we urge our colleagues to seize this opportunity that russia's succession to the world trade organization presents for both job creation and our ability to bind russia to a rule-based system of trade and dispute resolution. granting russia permanent normal trade relations is as much in our interest as it is in theirs. frankly, that's what ought to guide the choices that we make in the senate. the up side of this policy is clear on an international landscape. it is one that really offers this kind of what i would call, frankly, a kind of one-sided trade deal, one that promises billions of dollars in new u.s. exports and thousands of new jobs in america that is certainly in our interest. russia is today the world's seventh-largest economy. having officially joined the w.t.o. on august 22, russia is now required by its membership in the w.t.o. to lower tariffs and to open up to new imports. that sudden jump in market acc
that so unsecured when the british left and everyone else. if we don't change our strategy from a foreign policy, change this lightfoot print approach to the war on terror there will be more benghazis. martha: what about that morning. i'm joined by kt macfarland. kt, it's so interesting. you watch these shows and you hear benghazi brought up. so often the reacross is get over it. move on. move on. why should we not move on? >> because that wham we did in 1998 when there were twin bombings in u.s. embassies in east africa and in 2000 when there was an attack against the u.s.s. cole in the region. what are we doing now? fast forward a decade. we have had attacks on american soil at consulate and americans had died. what are we doing? we are arguing with ourselves. we know where those died training camps are in eastern libya. why not go after them. what is the lesson al qaeda takes from this? once again no consequences. the americans will be fighting each other, not us. i think we allow them to become emboldened, and this is a green light for continuing to attack americans. martha: what do y
occasional disagreements on the conduct of foreign policy but i think it's been very rare that we have seen differently our views of how the department of defense should undertake its responsibilities. i'd also like to, as the subcommittee chair of the personnel subcommittee, i'd like to express my appreciation to our staff for all the work that they have done on this bill and the others. gary lelee, john clark, bri fire and jennifer knowles. they have been always accessible, extremely professional. it's been a great privilege to work with them. and i'd like a special moment of privilege here to recognize gordon peterson, who has been my military assistant through my time in the united states senate. gordon peterson and i graduated from the naval academy in the same year. he was a very fine and respected athlete at the naval academy. he went on to become a helicopter pilot in combat in vietnam. he gave our country 30 years of distinguished service as a naval officer. later was the editor-in-chief of "seapower" magazine, was special assistant to the commandant of the coast guard, and has bee
article in foreign policy recently. has been was a china adviser to mitt romney. he now heads the university of chicago. but he basically wrote about the sort of two chinas or to the ages. he said there's sort of a doctor jekyll and mr. hide that's evolving to a doctor jekyll, which is the nicer of the two is the economic issue. the dr. height is the strategic asia, is the security agent. if you look at the economic asia there's heavy amounts of interdependence, everybody is investigating each other. $19 billion in regional trade which includes india. if you look at the security asia, national entity, orders dispute, historical grievances just are driving things apart and you're seeing real impact on these. in the has its own problems in the region across china region across china. region across chandigarh on the border dispute. if you look at this is something that you want to be deeply engaged in or do you look at this is basically something that you can ride along and freeload and let america and canada and japan handled? >> steve, your question -- >> i'm and freeload, by t
. they came up in every debate. even foreign policy debate. and so we think that the american people are on the side of the president and democrats. that is not to say -- [inaudible] we want to remind everyone that there's already been a trillion dollars, over a trillion dollars in spending cuts. and so that is a significant part of this debate, because it happened last year. but just because washington has a short memory doesn't mean we all should have one. and that there's already been sacrifice on behalf of through those discretionary cuts. we are particularly excited doing a lot of work on the fiscal cliff. we talked about medical savings through the programs, address rising national expenditure. will have more to say on taxes, but we are ecstatic to have senator durbin here today who has played such a fundamental role over the last several years. been part of literally every negotiation that has taken place. he still an optimist, so i think that is a sign of progress. he has had a long history of being a champion and advocate for the middle class. he has carried that advocacy in
things. they don't believe in the same way to prosperity. they don't believe in the same way in foreign policy. they can agree that they love america. we do know, in fact, that there has been some democratic interest in one governor romney's ideas, which was to put a cap on deductions. just say, okay, you can only take, you know, this much of your income, that kind of thing. can i see that there might be a discussion about that, but the specifics are not going to be dealt with between mitt romney and president obama. that ship sailed. this has to do with the president and basically the republicans on the house side, so i see this more as a photo op. i guess we're fwog get a still picture and a read-out about their nice, cordal meeting. i'm not saying nothing could happen. i just think it's hard to figure what it would be. there's ain't lot of love between them here. they have to make nice. how do they begin, do you think, to work in the same direction, to kind of put that aside? how much of this relationship really needs repairing? >> i don't know that either one of them feel it needs r
. what can our current president of the united states learn from churchhill's foreign policy? >> one thing churchhill would not believe in leading from behind. he believed in telling the facts and then rallying the people around the facts. >> steve: yeah. >> and what he can learn in this book, not only his many prophecies was proved to be true. but that the way he arrived at these predictions. that process is a premer for presidential leadership. >> steve: you think that it a big mistake for president obama in his first term to return that famous bust of churchhill to the british and took it out of the white house. >> well he did it, yes. when it went there the night before. yes, he was awful rejecting the wisdom of churchhill he could listen to churchhill he would say the important thing is not to be popular, but to be respected. and churchhill did that. he told the people the truth. that's the reason he was a great prophet not only did he know history but he had the courage to deliver the unvarnished facts unlike spineless politician or burrcrats. >> steve: maybe the president coul
. but as it relates to foreign policy, what would you say is our greatest challenge to move forward that no one is talking about? >> well, so what did the two most important people in this country sit down and talk about yesterday at lunch? when everything else is done and the election is wrapped up, it isn't about social issues. it isn't about the fringe issues. they sat down together and talked about america's leadership in the world. so at the end of the day, that's what matters most to republicans and to democrats. how do you get to where we need to be? it's going to be about economics. it's going to be about education. it's going to be about rounding out tax policies that serve our free market economy. and we're not there yet. but it was interesting when i read, you know, the news coming out of yesterday's lunch. at the end of the day, what is it we care most about? republicans, democrats, sit down and break bread. >> two things. first, ambassador, this idea that the corporations control our government destroys our democracy. and that's something i think republicans have to -- the progress
of its name will have a tough time getting to third. >> emily cadei is a foreign-policy writer for cq, congressional quarterly. you can read her work at rollcall.com and follow her on twitter@emily cadei. thanks. >> guest: absolutely. >> for the first time, bradley melling's attorney spoke out publicly on his client. manning is accused of leaking classified documents on wikileaks. manny's pretrial hearing is underway. this is a half-hour. [cheers and applause] >> thank you. thank you. well, i really appreciate the turnout here and especially the turnout by the press. thank you for that. [applause] as many of you know, i have not participated any public events before today. i also avoid any interviews with the media. it was and still is my belief that bradley manning deserves an attorney that is focused on what is happening in the courtroom and only what is happening in the courtroom. that is why i have chosen not to do the interviews. but today however marks a milestone and is actually supposed to be really to the motions hearing that we were going through and it would mark the end of
and rockets that smuggle to hamas. in the second term, no foreign policy challenge is more critical. the president has been dealing with iran's suspected nuclear threats. >> andrea mitchell in washington. thanks so much. >>> egypt islamists approved a draft constitution this morning that could further enrage anti-government protesters. it was passed without participation of liberal and christian members. human rights experts fear it could give muslim clerics influence over legislation and restrict freedom of speech and women's rights. >>> a spokesman says former president george h.w. bush should be able to leave the hospital by the weekend. he has been hospitalized for complications from bronchitis. >>> last day of trading for november. what's moving the markets? good morning, kayla. >> the stocks are following the fiscal cliff and the market dove yesterday on comments from house speaker john boehner. data released yesterday showed economic growth in the u.s. is still weak. consumers and businesses alike are putting a hold on spending. natalie? >> thank you. >>> and a grade school i
as chairman of the judiciary committee subcommittee on immigration policy and enforcement. he understands the nuances of our legal immigration system and the vital importance of secure borders, especially as it relates to his role as vice chairman of the foreign awares -- affairs committee he brought a unique perspective to the foreign affairs committee, having served eight years on the permanent select committee on intelligence, and counterintelligence subcommittee. in the aftermath of september 11, congressman fwalingly tchared subcommittee on internal -- international, excuse me, terrorism nonproliferation and human rights and held one of the first hearings on the 9/11 commission's recommendations, a hearing that led to more than 10 provisions that were included in the final bill. congressman gallegly's long, distinguished career has been supported by the love and support of his wife janis and their four children and 10 grarne. congressman gallegly's dedication to our national security, strong borders, legal immigration, has contribute immensely to the betterment of our nation and we c
respect to the memory of former >>> the defense and foreign policy writer for congressional quarterly. the senate has been in the holding pattern on the annual defense authorization bill that they finally found a way to start consideration of amendments. what broke the jam? >> rand paul had a desire to bring an amendment that would have applied the sixth amendment rights to the citizens who been taken in the war on chair on the u.s. homeland, and as a result, he was concerned he wouldn't get time. senator mccain was the ranking member on the senate armed services committee and managed the bill assured him he wouldn't try to block rand paul's amendment. ultimately, senator dianne feinstein brought an amendment that senator paul favors that would restrict or place some restrictions on the types of reasons that you could arrest an american citizen to not hold them indefinitely and so on, so forth. that amendment was approved. >> there were several other amendments to the bill. can you point those out and tell the outcome? >> typically the iran sanctions amendment that was approved specif
our foreign policy. the chair and i both have worked for several years now trying to get the law of the sea treaty into place. it's been bouncing around for decades. but it should be more than what they call consultation. every time we talk to the executive branch -- and i am a former member of the executive branch; i spent four years in the pentagon in the reagan administration -- they say that they have consulted and the definition of a consultation should be the secretary of state calling the chairman of the foreign relations committee or the secretary of defense calling the chairman of the armed services committee or coming over for a meeting. that is not the level of discussion and involvement that the united states congress should have when we are talking about long-term commitments with countries such as afghanistan and iraq. so this amendment is not draconian. it is very sensible. it basically says that in the situation where we have entered into this proposed relationship with afghanistan, that the key committees over here in the united states congress should have 30 day
security and foreign affairs to budget policy, he dug into pressing and often prickly issues and made a difference. well after his retirement from this body, a voluntary retirement, he continued to serve the country he loved so well. before the attacks on our nation on september 11, 2001, he and former senator garry hart headed a national advisory panel investigating the threat of international terrorism. the sobering conclusions they reached about our susceptability to terrorist attacks were prescient but largely forgotten until 9/11. so when i was asked to serve on the advisory board at the warren b. cente warren center in new hampshire, of course i was pleased to accept. and his legacy will be reflected well at the rudman center, just as his legacy of service and accomplishment will continue to be reflected, appreciated in this body. madam president, i say this -- it seems perfectly a ppropriate that the distinguished senior senator from new hampshire is presiding. but the senate and the nation for warren rudman's service. madam president, i ask unanimous consent that rosscummings
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17